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Hendersonville Times-News: Top Stories

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Updated: 28 min 29 sec ago

Yoga And Massage opens in Hendersonville

9 hours 42 min ago
A runner and Crossfit enthusiast, local massage therapist Averee Refshauge had never practiced much yoga — until she became injured and discovered its healing and strengthening powers.
Now Refshauge has incorporated her massage practice, yoga instruction and the infrared heat of "hot" yoga sessions into Yoga And Massage, a wellness studio at the heart of Hendersonville, offering classes suited for everyone from the seasoned yogi to the senior looking to improve circulation.
Through her own experiences with therapeutic yoga, feedback from her massage clients and research, Refshauge discovered that yoga eases joint pain, improves blood circulation and a person's range of motion, and reduces body tension.
"It helps arthritis," Refshauge said, adding that she recommends yoga to her massage clients.
Even more therapeutic are warm and hot yoga classes, which are heated by infrared heat.
"The infrared heat is like the sun's heat, and it penetrates into the skin three inches," Refshauge said. And instead of warming the air in a room, she explained, "Infrared heat heats the objects in the room."
When she opened YAM a few weeks ago, Refshauge realized that the idea of yoga — especially hot yoga — could seem scary to people who've never tried it. In fact, after doing research on the subject, Refshauge said, "Forty percent of Americans want to try (yoga) but they're too intimidated."
That's why YAM is staffed with multiple instructors teaching different styles of yoga — from therapeutic to more advanced poses — and offers classes geared toward a range of skill level and comfort.
"We're trying to ease people in," Refshauge said.
"There's a class for everyone," added Brooke McDade, one of the nine instructors at YAM.
Refshauge said most of the instructors were already familiar with and taught in the Hendersonville and Asheville areas before coming to YAM.
In addition to Refshauge, YAM has two massage therapists on staff and offers massages by appointment.
Though YAM's only been open for a few weeks and new signs are just going up at the 410 S. King St. address, Refshauge said the response from the local community has been positive. Seventy people attended the business' open house, and YAM's first six-week beginner yoga workshop was so full there's a waiting list for the next.
Also popular are the donation-based Sunday classes, Refshauge said.
"We've had the room totally packed out," she said. "I think the holidays and the new year is going to be crazy."
Yoga And Massage is open Monday through Saturday, with class schedules listed online at www.iamyam.com. Walk-ins for classes are welcome, though individuals can purchase various levels of class cards, including the five-class card or full year membership.
Yoga workshops require advance registration, and appointments by phone or online are required for massages. Call 828-214-7947 for more information.
Reach McGowan at molly.mcgowan@blueridgenow.com or 828-694-7871.
Categories: News

Comporium Digital Video system to receive upgrades

9 hours 42 min ago
Beginning Monday, the Comporium Digital Video system will be upgraded, offering faster Internet speeds and new services to customers in Transylvania County.
An 18- to 24-month process, the $5.5 million project will provide a more reliable internet system with faster speeds, as well as additional television services like Video on Demand, and Pay per View, local general manager Frank Porter said in a news release.
More than 7,000 Comporium Internet customers currently being served by the former Citizens Telephone’s copper facilities — known as DSL — will be affected by the change; another 3,600 DSL customers fall outside the company’s footprint and will not receive the upgrade, according to the release.
Only those DSL customers at the lowest tier (7 Mbps) will see a rate increase, from $46.95 to $49.95, effective six months after the conversion. Comporium will mail notices to customers in advance of their upgrades, so they can plan for cable TV interruptions during the upgrade.
For more information on the upgrade, visit www.comporium.com.
Categories: News

Community Briefs: Oct. 25

9 hours 42 min ago
Volunteer fair at Pardee
The Pardee Hospital Auxiliary will host a Volunteer Fair from 10-11:30 a.m. Wednesday in the Jamison Conference Room of Pardee, 800 N. Justice St., Hendersonville. The event will focus on various opportunities for volunteers at Pardee, discuss requirements for volunteering and how people can become engaged with the program.
Volunteer opportunities with Pardee Hospital include, but are not limited to, greeting visitors, delivering flowers to patients, working in the Garden Café or Gift Shop, transporting and escorting patients and visitors in the hospital, and assisting in different areas of the hospital.
For the safety and protection of our patients, Pardee Hospital will perform a background investigation including a Criminal History Records Check for all new volunteer applications.
For more information about Pardee Hospital, visit www.pardeehospital.org.
Meetings
The Flat Rock Park Advisory Board will meet at 4 p.m. Monday in the Highlander Room of Village Hall.
The North Henderson High School Improvement Team will meet at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday in the media conference room of the North Henderson High School.
The Sugarloaf Elementary School Improvement Team will meet at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday in room 404 of Sugarloaf Elementary School.
Events
The Apple Country Woodcrafters will meet at 6:30 p.m. Monday at the shop, 5628 Howard Gap Road, East Flat Rock. Social time with refreshments at 6 p.m. The program this month is "Hand Tool Sharpening," presented by Phil Rasmussen. Info: 890-4251.
The Camera Club of Hendersonville will meet from 6:30– 9 p.m. Tuesday in the Chamber of Commerce building. The session will feature critiques of club member's images by well-known National Geographic photographer Tom Nebbia. Visitors welcome. Info: www.cameraclubofhendersonville.com.
The Mineral & Lapidary Museum and Community Foundation are teaming up to bring an event on North Carolina emeralds at 7 p.m. Monday at the Opportunity House, 1411 Asheville Highway, Hendersonville. Geologist Edward Speer will speak. Coffee and the chance to speak with Speer will follow the presentation.
Mother Goose Troop, a local children's theatre group, will present "Snow White & Rose Red, a Musical Fantasy in One Act," at 4 p.m. Monday in the Henderson County Library's Kaplan Auditorium, 311 N. Washington St., Hendersonville.
Categories: News

Yoga And Massage opens in Hendersonville

9 hours 42 min ago
A runner and Crossfit enthusiast, local massage therapist Averee Refshauge had never practiced much yoga — until she became injured and discovered its healing and strengthening powers.
Now Refshauge has incorporated her massage practice, yoga instruction and the infrared heat of "hot" yoga sessions into Yoga And Massage, a wellness studio at the heart of Hendersonville, offering classes suited for everyone from the seasoned yogi to the senior looking to improve circulation.
Through her own experiences with therapeutic yoga, feedback from her massage clients and research, Refshauge discovered that yoga eases joint pain, improves blood circulation and a person's range of motion, and reduces body tension.
"It helps arthritis," Refshauge said, adding that she recommends yoga to her massage clients.
Even more therapeutic are warm and hot yoga classes, which are heated by infrared heat.
"The infrared heat is like the sun's heat, and it penetrates into the skin three inches," Refshauge said. And instead of warming the air in a room, she explained, "Infrared heat heats the objects in the room."
When she opened YAM a few weeks ago, Refshauge realized that the idea of yoga — especially hot yoga — could seem scary to people who've never tried it. In fact, after doing research on the subject, Refshauge said, "Forty percent of Americans want to try (yoga) but they're too intimidated."
That's why YAM is staffed with multiple instructors teaching different styles of yoga — from therapeutic to more advanced poses — and offers classes geared toward a range of skill level and comfort.
"We're trying to ease people in," Refshauge said.
"There's a class for everyone," added Brooke McDade, one of the nine instructors at YAM.
Refshauge said most of the instructors were already familiar with and taught in the Hendersonville and Asheville areas before coming to YAM.
In addition to Refshauge, YAM has two massage therapists on staff and offers massages by appointment.
Though YAM's only been open for a few weeks and new signs are just going up at the 410 S. King St. address, Refshauge said the response from the local community has been positive. Seventy people attended the business' open house, and YAM's first six-week beginner yoga workshop was so full there's a waiting list for the next.
Also popular are the donation-based Sunday classes, Refshauge said.
"We've had the room totally packed out," she said. "I think the holidays and the new year is going to be crazy."
Yoga And Massage is open Monday through Saturday, with class schedules listed online at www.iamyam.com. Walk-ins for classes are welcome, though individuals can purchase various levels of class cards, including the five-class card or full year membership.
Yoga workshops require advance registration, and appointments by phone or online are required for massages. Call 828-214-7947 for more information.
Reach McGowan at molly.mcgowan@blueridgenow.com or 828-694-7871.
Categories: News

Comporium Digital Video system to receive upgrades

9 hours 42 min ago
Beginning Monday, the Comporium Digital Video system will be upgraded, offering faster Internet speeds and new services to customers in Transylvania County.
An 18- to 24-month process, the $5.5 million project will provide a more reliable internet system with faster speeds, as well as additional television services like Video on Demand, and Pay per View, local general manager Frank Porter said in a news release.
More than 7,000 Comporium Internet customers currently being served by the former Citizens Telephone’s copper facilities — known as DSL — will be affected by the change; another 3,600 DSL customers fall outside the company’s footprint and will not receive the upgrade, according to the release.
Only those DSL customers at the lowest tier (7 Mbps) will see a rate increase, from $46.95 to $49.95, effective six months after the conversion. Comporium will mail notices to customers in advance of their upgrades, so they can plan for cable TV interruptions during the upgrade.
For more information on the upgrade, visit www.comporium.com.
Categories: News

Community Briefs: Oct. 25

9 hours 42 min ago
Volunteer fair at Pardee
The Pardee Hospital Auxiliary will host a Volunteer Fair from 10-11:30 a.m. Wednesday in the Jamison Conference Room of Pardee, 800 N. Justice St., Hendersonville. The event will focus on various opportunities for volunteers at Pardee, discuss requirements for volunteering and how people can become engaged with the program.
Volunteer opportunities with Pardee Hospital include, but are not limited to, greeting visitors, delivering flowers to patients, working in the Garden Café or Gift Shop, transporting and escorting patients and visitors in the hospital, and assisting in different areas of the hospital.
For the safety and protection of our patients, Pardee Hospital will perform a background investigation including a Criminal History Records Check for all new volunteer applications.
For more information about Pardee Hospital, visit www.pardeehospital.org.
Meetings
The Flat Rock Park Advisory Board will meet at 4 p.m. Monday in the Highlander Room of Village Hall.
The North Henderson High School Improvement Team will meet at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday in the media conference room of the North Henderson High School.
The Sugarloaf Elementary School Improvement Team will meet at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday in room 404 of Sugarloaf Elementary School.
Events
The Apple Country Woodcrafters will meet at 6:30 p.m. Monday at the shop, 5628 Howard Gap Road, East Flat Rock. Social time with refreshments at 6 p.m. The program this month is "Hand Tool Sharpening," presented by Phil Rasmussen. Info: 890-4251.
The Camera Club of Hendersonville will meet from 6:30– 9 p.m. Tuesday in the Chamber of Commerce building. The session will feature critiques of club member's images by well-known National Geographic photographer Tom Nebbia. Visitors welcome. Info: www.cameraclubofhendersonville.com.
The Mineral & Lapidary Museum and Community Foundation are teaming up to bring an event on North Carolina emeralds at 7 p.m. Monday at the Opportunity House, 1411 Asheville Highway, Hendersonville. Geologist Edward Speer will speak. Coffee and the chance to speak with Speer will follow the presentation.
Mother Goose Troop, a local children's theatre group, will present "Snow White & Rose Red, a Musical Fantasy in One Act," at 4 p.m. Monday in the Henderson County Library's Kaplan Auditorium, 311 N. Washington St., Hendersonville.
Categories: News

Three county teams make it to the quarterfinals

12 hours 43 min ago
Six area teams qualified for the high school volleyball state playoffs, and all six made it to Thursday's third round. After the dust cleared Thursday night, three area teams were left standing, and all are Henderson County teams — Hendersonville, West Henderson and North Henderson.
All three are traditional volleyball powerhouses, and all three are regulars in the postseason. Hendersonville has 11 state titles and has two straight state titles, winning it as a 1-A squad in 2012 and 2-A last year. West has made it to the state finals nine times, winning five titles.
But the Lady Knights of North have yet to make it to the state finals, and they're hoping to change that fact when next week rolls around. Coming in as a 17th seed, North (16-7) has already taken out the top seed, which was previously-unbeaten Cox Mill.
On Thursday against No. 9 North Iredell, the Lady Knights' big hitter, Caroline Marsh, twisted her ankle late in the match. But she fought through the pain and finished with 26 kills, helping North to Saturday's quarterfinals at another higher seed, No. 5 Marvin Ridge (24-1).
It will be the fourth straight long bus trip for coach Sue Moon and her girls, but Moon said the girls relish it.
“They have really handled it well. Each one of the trips has been well over two hours. The one coming up to Marvin Ridge is close to three,” Moon said.
If Marvin Ridge had lost in Thursday's third round, the bus trip would've been a lot shorter to Enka, where Moon coached for eight years from 2000-08 before returning to North.
“It's probably better that we're facing a team that doesn't know us that well. We like being under the radar,” Moon said.
Moon said she had a few teams at North back in the mid-1990s that made it to the state semifinals. She's hoping this year's squad will do the same and possibly even one better.
“The girls love being considered underdogs, but they know all we have to do is be better than the other team on that one night. That's how we're approaching each game,” she said.
If the Lady Knights win and if No. 2 seed West (25-1) defeats No. 3 seed South Iredell on Saturday, North will be at West in Tuesday's 3-A state semifinals.
In Saturday's 2-A quarterfinals at Wheatmore, it's a rematch of last year's 2-A state title match, a match Hendersonville (24-2) won 3-1 over Wheatmore (24-3) by scores of 25-20, 26-24, 22-25, 25-21.
Categories: News

Blaze challenges firefighters, destroys mountaintop home

12 hours 43 min ago
A man living on a mountain in the back country of Deep Gap Road had just stepped out of his garage at around noon Thursday when he saw flames and smoke coming from his house. He called 911.
When firefighters arrived, the one-story brick ranch with a basement at 1129 Laurel Mountain View Road was fully engulfed in flames and its roof had caved in, said Deputy Fire Chief Ben Lanning of Dana Fire & Rescue.
The house — perched nearly two miles up a narrow gravel road at the top of another tricky, inclined driveway — became a challenge as firefighters looked to get water to the scene.
Lanning said they drafted water from Hungry River and used a tanker shuttle to transport it to the fire.
“Tankers had to pull past the house and back up the driveway,” he said, to get water to a portable tank used to fight the fire at the scene.
The blaze spread nearly five feet into the woodline near the house, Lanning said, but the fire was under control by about 2:30 p.m.
The house was a total loss and very little, if anything, was salvageable. The American Red Cross is assisting the homeowner.
Fire and rescue departments from Blue Ridge, Mountain Home, Edneyville and the city of Hendersonville assisted Dana at the scene, along with the Henderson County Rescue Squad, Henderson County EMS and the N.C. Forest Service.
Reach Weaver at Emily.weaver@blueridgenow.com or 828-694-7867.
Follow Weaver on Twitter at https://twitter.com/EmilyWORDWeaver
Categories: News

Three county teams make it to the quarterfinals

12 hours 43 min ago
Six area teams qualified for the high school volleyball state playoffs, and all six made it to Thursday's third round. After the dust cleared Thursday night, three area teams were left standing, and all are Henderson County teams — Hendersonville, West Henderson and North Henderson.
All three are traditional volleyball powerhouses, and all three are regulars in the postseason. Hendersonville has 11 state titles and has two straight state titles, winning it as a 1-A squad in 2012 and 2-A last year. West has made it to the state finals nine times, winning five titles.
But the Lady Knights of North have yet to make it to the state finals, and they're hoping to change that fact when next week rolls around. Coming in as a 17th seed, North (16-7) has already taken out the top seed, which was previously-unbeaten Cox Mill.
On Thursday against No. 9 North Iredell, the Lady Knights' big hitter, Caroline Marsh, twisted her ankle late in the match. But she fought through the pain and finished with 26 kills, helping North to Saturday's quarterfinals at another higher seed, No. 5 Marvin Ridge (24-1).
It will be the fourth straight long bus trip for coach Sue Moon and her girls, but Moon said the girls relish it.
“They have really handled it well. Each one of the trips has been well over two hours. The one coming up to Marvin Ridge is close to three,” Moon said.
If Marvin Ridge had lost in Thursday's third round, the bus trip would've been a lot shorter to Enka, where Moon coached for eight years from 2000-08 before returning to North.
“It's probably better that we're facing a team that doesn't know us that well. We like being under the radar,” Moon said.
Moon said she had a few teams at North back in the mid-1990s that made it to the state semifinals. She's hoping this year's squad will do the same and possibly even one better.
“The girls love being considered underdogs, but they know all we have to do is be better than the other team on that one night. That's how we're approaching each game,” she said.
If the Lady Knights win and if No. 2 seed West (25-1) defeats No. 3 seed South Iredell on Saturday, North will be at West in Tuesday's 3-A state semifinals.
In Saturday's 2-A quarterfinals at Wheatmore, it's a rematch of last year's 2-A state title match, a match Hendersonville (24-2) won 3-1 over Wheatmore (24-3) by scores of 25-20, 26-24, 22-25, 25-21.
Categories: News

Blaze challenges firefighters, destroys mountaintop home

12 hours 43 min ago
A man living on a mountain in the back country of Deep Gap Road had just stepped out of his garage at around noon Thursday when he saw flames and smoke coming from his house. He called 911.
When firefighters arrived, the one-story brick ranch with a basement at 1129 Laurel Mountain View Road was fully engulfed in flames and its roof had caved in, said Deputy Fire Chief Ben Lanning of Dana Fire & Rescue.
The house — perched nearly two miles up a narrow gravel road at the top of another tricky, inclined driveway — became a challenge as firefighters looked to get water to the scene.
Lanning said they drafted water from Hungry River and used a tanker shuttle to transport it to the fire.
“Tankers had to pull past the house and back up the driveway,” he said, to get water to a portable tank used to fight the fire at the scene.
The blaze spread nearly five feet into the woodline near the house, Lanning said, but the fire was under control by about 2:30 p.m.
The house was a total loss and very little, if anything, was salvageable. The American Red Cross is assisting the homeowner.
Fire and rescue departments from Blue Ridge, Mountain Home, Edneyville and the city of Hendersonville assisted Dana at the scene, along with the Henderson County Rescue Squad, Henderson County EMS and the N.C. Forest Service.
Reach Weaver at Emily.weaver@blueridgenow.com or 828-694-7867.
Follow Weaver on Twitter at https://twitter.com/EmilyWORDWeaver
Categories: News

Bearcats fall in 57-54 shootout with Warhorses

Fri, 10/24/2014 - 23:59
BLACK MOUNTAIN — On the first cold night of football in Western North Carolina, two Western Highlands Conference offenses heated up.
Owen outlasted Hendersonville 57-54 in a clash between the conference foes.
Hendersonville (7-3, 3-2) started off hot as quarterback Michael Schmidt led the Bearcats down the field and Terrold Gary punched in a score from one-yard out. Then the Bearcat defense had Owen in a fourth-and-long situation when the lights literally went out.
After a 20-minute delay, the Warhorses struck with a 28-yard touchdown pass from Sam Drummond to Tate Brown. That was just the beginning.
Owen (8-0, 5-0) got two first-half touchdowns from Austin Bennett and Jager Gardner and another from Zee Johnston. Hendersonville got first-half touchdowns on a 46-yard run by Cole Cleary, a 36-yard reception by Michael Cook, a 27-yard reception by Cook and a 35-yard reception by Cleary.
Owen was up 43-33 at the half.
The offenses weren't finished.
In the second half Owen got a quick 8-yard touchdown by Gardner. Hendersonville responded two drives later when Schmidt ran in a quarterback keeper from 18 yards out for a touchdown. As the third quarter closed, Blake Lyda picked up an Owen fumble and carried it inside the 10-yard-line, but fumbled. Hendersonville's Tully Graziano was there to pick it up and run it in for a touchdown.
Owen answered quickly in the fourth quarter. Bennett ran in his third touchdown of the night from one yard out. On Hendersonville's next drive, Cleary ran in a 23-yard touchdown.
After that, the Bearcats were down 57-54 and had their best chance of the night. On the kickoff, the Bearcats recovered an onside kick, but after five plays turned it over on downs. The Warhorses got two first downs on their next drive — enough to take a knee.
Hendersonville will not be in action next week. Owen will travel to Polk County in a battle for first place in the conference.
Categories: News

Bearcats fall in 57-54 shootout with Warhorses

Fri, 10/24/2014 - 23:59
BLACK MOUNTAIN — On the first cold night of football in Western North Carolina, two Western Highlands Conference offenses heated up.
Owen outlasted Hendersonville 57-54 in a clash between the conference foes.
Hendersonville (7-3, 3-2) started off hot as quarterback Michael Schmidt led the Bearcats down the field and Terrold Gary punched in a score from one-yard out. Then the Bearcat defense had Owen in a fourth-and-long situation when the lights literally went out.
After a 20-minute delay, the Warhorses struck with a 28-yard touchdown pass from Sam Drummond to Tate Brown. That was just the beginning.
Owen (8-0, 5-0) got two first-half touchdowns from Austin Bennett and Jager Gardner and another from Zee Johnston. Hendersonville got first-half touchdowns on a 46-yard run by Cole Cleary, a 36-yard reception by Michael Cook, a 27-yard reception by Cook and a 35-yard reception by Cleary.
Owen was up 43-33 at the half.
The offenses weren't finished.
In the second half Owen got a quick 8-yard touchdown by Gardner. Hendersonville responded two drives later when Schmidt ran in a quarterback keeper from 18 yards out for a touchdown. As the third quarter closed, Blake Lyda picked up an Owen fumble and carried it inside the 10-yard-line, but fumbled. Hendersonville's Tully Graziano was there to pick it up and run it in for a touchdown.
Owen answered quickly in the fourth quarter. Bennett ran in his third touchdown of the night from one yard out. On Hendersonville's next drive, Cleary ran in a 23-yard touchdown.
After that, the Bearcats were down 57-54 and had their best chance of the night. On the kickoff, the Bearcats recovered an onside kick, but after five plays turned it over on downs. The Warhorses got two first downs on their next drive — enough to take a knee.
Hendersonville will not be in action next week. Owen will travel to Polk County in a battle for first place in the conference.
Categories: News

West Henderson rallies for big win at Tuscola

Fri, 10/24/2014 - 23:57
WAYNESVILLE — With the visiting West Henderson Falcons clinging to a two-point lead, the Tuscola stands erupted when Parker Allen threw what appeared to be a 27-yard touchdown pass to take the lead with just over a minute left in the game.
What they did not see was an official ruled that Allen's pass hit the ground and was incomplete.
After tacking on a 15-yard unsportsmanlike conduct penalty to a member of the Tuscola coaching staff, the Falcons (6-3, 4-1 WNC Athletic Conference) went into victory formation, sealing a thrilling, come-from-behind 23-21 win over the Mountaineers (4-5, 3-2 WNCAC) on Friday night.
"This was a great game. I give a lot of credit to Tuscola, but this was a team effort for us tonight," said Falcon head coach Paul Whitaker.
The comeback started early in the fourth quarter, as Brendan Goings (10 carries, 37 yards) pounded the interior for the Falcons and Taylor Geyer caught a 23-yard pass from William Couch, before Goings plunged in for a 3-yard score to cut the lead to 21-17.
A Falcon drive that started at their own 32 stalled out deep in Mountaineer territory. Then their defense rose to the occasion, as Tanner Bullock scooped up a botched handoff at the Tuscola 17-yard line.
After Cody Jackson (16 carries for 82 yards, one catch for 63 yards) set the table for Goings to find paydirt for the second time from the 3, the Falcons had their first lead of the night at 23-21.
"It was about as bad of a first half as we could have played. We knew we were in the game, as we only down 14-7 at the half," said Whitaker.
With the ball on the Falcons' 6, the Mountaineers were threatening to extend their lead before halftime. But an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty and a sack by Bullock pushed the Mountaineers back to midfield to thwart the drive.
The Falcon victory sets the stage for a key WNCAC showdown next Friday, as the undefeated Franklin Panthers make the trip up to Mills River.
Categories: News

West Henderson rallies for big win at Tuscola

Fri, 10/24/2014 - 23:57
WAYNESVILLE — With the visiting West Henderson Falcons clinging to a two-point lead, the Tuscola stands erupted when Parker Allen threw what appeared to be a 27-yard touchdown pass to take the lead with just over a minute left in the game.
What they did not see was an official ruled that Allen's pass hit the ground and was incomplete.
After tacking on a 15-yard unsportsmanlike conduct penalty to a member of the Tuscola coaching staff, the Falcons (6-3, 4-1 WNC Athletic Conference) went into victory formation, sealing a thrilling, come-from-behind 23-21 win over the Mountaineers (4-5, 3-2 WNCAC) on Friday night.
"This was a great game. I give a lot of credit to Tuscola, but this was a team effort for us tonight," said Falcon head coach Paul Whitaker.
The comeback started early in the fourth quarter, as Brendan Goings (10 carries, 37 yards) pounded the interior for the Falcons and Taylor Geyer caught a 23-yard pass from William Couch, before Goings plunged in for a 3-yard score to cut the lead to 21-17.
A Falcon drive that started at their own 32 stalled out deep in Mountaineer territory. Then their defense rose to the occasion, as Tanner Bullock scooped up a botched handoff at the Tuscola 17-yard line.
After Cody Jackson (16 carries for 82 yards, one catch for 63 yards) set the table for Goings to find paydirt for the second time from the 3, the Falcons had their first lead of the night at 23-21.
"It was about as bad of a first half as we could have played. We knew we were in the game, as we only down 14-7 at the half," said Whitaker.
With the ball on the Falcons' 6, the Mountaineers were threatening to extend their lead before halftime. But an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty and a sack by Bullock pushed the Mountaineers back to midfield to thwart the drive.
The Falcon victory sets the stage for a key WNCAC showdown next Friday, as the undefeated Franklin Panthers make the trip up to Mills River.
Categories: News

Prep football roundup: North falls to Pisgah; Rosman wins at home

Fri, 10/24/2014 - 23:43
CANTON — North Henderson held a 10-7 lead over Pisgah in the third quarter, and then the Black Bears erupted for 25 unanswered points en route to a 35-10 WNC Athletic Conference victory.
The Knights remain winless at 0-9 and 0-5 in the conference, while the Bears improve to 6-3 and 4-1, tied with West Henderson for second place in the league.
The game was halted with three minutes left when a Pisgah fan had to be rushed to the hospital by a helicopter from an apparent heart attack. There was no immediate word on the fan’s condition.
North will host Brevard next Friday night.
ROSMAN 46, CHEROKEE 22: At Rosman, running back Tanner Green had four touchdown runs, and quarterback Joshua Rice had two as the Tigers piled up 525 yards rushing in a big Smoky Mountain Conference victory. The Braves fall to 3-6 and 1-3 in the SMC, while the Tigers improve to 4-5 and 3-2. Green started the scoring with a 54-yard TD run in the first quarter, and Rice added a 26-yard run. Green had another big run in the second half, this time from 41 yards out. Later in the third quarter, he broke loose again for a 48-yard TD run. Gage Orr had a 42-yard run for a touchdown right after Green’s big run. The Tigers will close out their conference schedule next Friday night at Swain County.
FRANKLIN 44, EAST HENDERSON 6: At Franklin, Jeremiah Young had four touchdown runs to lead the Panthers to their ninth straight win. They are now 9-0 and 5-0 in the WNC Athletic Conference. The Eagles fall to 3-6 and 3-2. East’s lone score came late in the fourth quarter with Jesse Rogers hauled in a 20-yard TD pass from Trace Goldsmith. East will be back on the road again next Friday night with a trip to Tuscola.
SMOKY MOUNTAIN 48, BREVARD 14: In Sylva, Brevard scored on its opening drive but wouldn’t score again until the final minutes of the game. The Mustangs finished with 367 yards of total offense, and the defense had a big 55-yard interception return by Josh Gas to start the second half. The Blue Devils remain winless at 0-9 and 0-5 in the WNC Athletic Conference, while the Mustangs improve to 2-7 and 1-4. Brevard will be at North Henderson next Friday night in a battle of winless teams.
Categories: News

Prep football roundup: North falls to Pisgah; Rosman wins at home

Fri, 10/24/2014 - 23:43
CANTON — North Henderson held a 10-7 lead over Pisgah in the third quarter, and then the Black Bears erupted for 25 unanswered points en route to a 35-10 WNC Athletic Conference victory.
The Knights remain winless at 0-9 and 0-5 in the conference, while the Bears improve to 6-3 and 4-1, tied with West Henderson for second place in the league.
The game was halted with three minutes left when a Pisgah fan had to be rushed to the hospital by a helicopter from an apparent heart attack. There was no immediate word on the fan’s condition.
North will host Brevard next Friday night.
ROSMAN 46, CHEROKEE 22: At Rosman, running back Tanner Green had four touchdown runs, and quarterback Joshua Rice had two as the Tigers piled up 525 yards rushing in a big Smoky Mountain Conference victory. The Braves fall to 3-6 and 1-3 in the SMC, while the Tigers improve to 4-5 and 3-2. Green started the scoring with a 54-yard TD run in the first quarter, and Rice added a 26-yard run. Green had another big run in the second half, this time from 41 yards out. Later in the third quarter, he broke loose again for a 48-yard TD run. Gage Orr had a 42-yard run for a touchdown right after Green’s big run. The Tigers will close out their conference schedule next Friday night at Swain County.
FRANKLIN 44, EAST HENDERSON 6: At Franklin, Jeremiah Young had four touchdown runs to lead the Panthers to their ninth straight win. They are now 9-0 and 5-0 in the WNC Athletic Conference. The Eagles fall to 3-6 and 3-2. East’s lone score came late in the fourth quarter with Jesse Rogers hauled in a 20-yard TD pass from Trace Goldsmith. East will be back on the road again next Friday night with a trip to Tuscola.
SMOKY MOUNTAIN 48, BREVARD 14: In Sylva, Brevard scored on its opening drive but wouldn’t score again until the final minutes of the game. The Mustangs finished with 367 yards of total offense, and the defense had a big 55-yard interception return by Josh Gas to start the second half. The Blue Devils remain winless at 0-9 and 0-5 in the WNC Athletic Conference, while the Mustangs improve to 2-7 and 1-4. Brevard will be at North Henderson next Friday night in a battle of winless teams.
Categories: News

ZeekRewards president indicted on federal charges

Fri, 10/24/2014 - 21:36
CHARLOTTE – The president of ZeekRewards, Paul Burks, has been indicted on federal charges for operating an Internet Ponzi scheme that took in more than $850 million dollars, announced Anne M. Tompkins, U.S. Attorney for the Western District of North Carolina.
The criminal indictment was returned Friday by a federal grand jury in Charlotte, charging Burks, 67, of Lexington, with wire and mail fraud conspiracy, wire and mail fraud, and tax fraud conspiracy, according to a news release.
According to allegations contained in the indictment, from January 2010 through August 2012, Burks was the owner of Rex Venture Group LLC (RVG), through which he owned and operated Zeekler, a sham Internet-based penny auction company, and its purported advertising division, ZeekRewards (collectively “Zeek”).
The indictment alleges that Burks and his conspirators induced victims – including over 1,500 victims in the Charlotte area – to invest in their fraudulent scheme, by falsely representing that Zeekler was generating massive retail profits from its penny auctions, and that the public could share in such profits through investment in ZeekRewards.
The indictment alleges that Burks and others claimed, at one point, that investors would be guaranteed a 125 percent return on their investment. The indictment also alleges that Burks and his conspirators represented that victim-investors in ZeekRewards could participate in the Retail Profit Pool, which supposedly allowed victims collectively to share 50 percent of Zeek's daily net profits. The indictment alleges that Burksand his conspirators did not keep books and records needed to calculate such daily figures, and that Burks simply made up the daily “profit” numbers.
The indictment further alleges that, contrary to the conspirators' claims, the true revenue from the scheme did not come from the penny auction's “massive profits.” Instead, about 98 percent of all incoming funds came from victim-investors, which were then used to make Ponzi-style payments to earlier victim investors.
In addition to promising massive returns on investments, the indictment alleges that the conspirators also used a number of ways to promote Zeek to current and potential investors. For example, according to the indictment, the conspirators hosted weekly conference calls and leadership calls, where participants could call in and listen to Burks and others make false representations intended to encourage victim-investors to continue to invest money and to recruit others to invest in Zeek.
The indictment further alleges that Burks organized and attended “Red Carpet Events,” where victim investors came to hear details of the scheme in person. During these events, according to the indictment, Burks and his conspirators made false representations about the massive retail profits generated by Zeek.
The conspirators also used electronic and print media, including websites, emails and journals, to make false and misleading statements about the success of Zeekler to recruit victim investors.
The indictment alleges that as the Ponzi scheme grew in size and scope, it began to unravel as the outstanding liability resulting from the bogus 125 percent return on investment continued to rise beyond control. According to the indictment, by August 2012, the conspirators fraudulently represented to the collective victims that their investments were worth approximately $2.8 billion, but had no accurate books and records to even determine how much cash on hand was available to pay such liability.
According to the indictment, by Aug. 17, 2012, Burks and his conspirators had only $320 million (or about 11 percent of $2.8 billion) available to pay out investors. The indictment alleges that over the course of the scheme, Burks diverted approximately $10.1 million to himself.
Burks is charged with tax fraud conspiracy for failing to file corporate tax returns or to make corporate tax payments for his companies, among other things. In addition, the indictment alleges, for tax year 2011, Burks issued fraudulent IRS Forms 1099s, causing victim-investors to file inaccurate tax returns for phantom income they never actually received.
The court has issued a summons against Burks and he is expected to appear in federal court for his initial appearance in the coming days. The wire and mail fraud conspiracy charge, the mail fraud charge and wire fraud charge each carry a maximum prison term of 20 years and a $250,000 fine. The tax fraud conspiracy charge carries a maximum prison term of five years and a $250,000 fine.
Two of Burks' conspirators, Dawn Wright Olivares, Zeek's chief operating officer, and her step-son and Zeek's senior technology officer, Daniel C. Olivares, pleaded guilty in December 2013 to investment fraud conspiracy. Dawn Wright Olivares also pleaded guilty to tax fraud conspiracy. Both defendants await sentencing.
The prosecution is handled by Assistant United States Attorneys Jenny Grus Sugar, Corey Ellis and Mark T. Odulio of the U.S. Attorney's Office in Charlotte.
Additional information and updated court filings about this and related cases filings can be accessed at the district's website: www.justice.gov/usao/ncw/ncwvwa.html.
Categories: News

ZeekRewards president indicted on federal charges

Fri, 10/24/2014 - 21:36
CHARLOTTE – The president of ZeekRewards, Paul Burks, has been indicted on federal charges for operating an Internet Ponzi scheme that took in more than $850 million dollars, announced Anne M. Tompkins, U.S. Attorney for the Western District of North Carolina.
The criminal indictment was returned Friday by a federal grand jury in Charlotte, charging Burks, 67, of Lexington, with wire and mail fraud conspiracy, wire and mail fraud, and tax fraud conspiracy, according to a news release.
According to allegations contained in the indictment, from January 2010 through August 2012, Burks was the owner of Rex Venture Group LLC (RVG), through which he owned and operated Zeekler, a sham Internet-based penny auction company, and its purported advertising division, ZeekRewards (collectively “Zeek”).
The indictment alleges that Burks and his conspirators induced victims – including over 1,500 victims in the Charlotte area – to invest in their fraudulent scheme, by falsely representing that Zeekler was generating massive retail profits from its penny auctions, and that the public could share in such profits through investment in ZeekRewards.
The indictment alleges that Burks and others claimed, at one point, that investors would be guaranteed a 125 percent return on their investment. The indictment also alleges that Burks and his conspirators represented that victim-investors in ZeekRewards could participate in the Retail Profit Pool, which supposedly allowed victims collectively to share 50 percent of Zeek's daily net profits. The indictment alleges that Burksand his conspirators did not keep books and records needed to calculate such daily figures, and that Burks simply made up the daily “profit” numbers.
The indictment further alleges that, contrary to the conspirators' claims, the true revenue from the scheme did not come from the penny auction's “massive profits.” Instead, about 98 percent of all incoming funds came from victim-investors, which were then used to make Ponzi-style payments to earlier victim investors.
In addition to promising massive returns on investments, the indictment alleges that the conspirators also used a number of ways to promote Zeek to current and potential investors. For example, according to the indictment, the conspirators hosted weekly conference calls and leadership calls, where participants could call in and listen to Burks and others make false representations intended to encourage victim-investors to continue to invest money and to recruit others to invest in Zeek.
The indictment further alleges that Burks organized and attended “Red Carpet Events,” where victim investors came to hear details of the scheme in person. During these events, according to the indictment, Burks and his conspirators made false representations about the massive retail profits generated by Zeek.
The conspirators also used electronic and print media, including websites, emails and journals, to make false and misleading statements about the success of Zeekler to recruit victim investors.
The indictment alleges that as the Ponzi scheme grew in size and scope, it began to unravel as the outstanding liability resulting from the bogus 125 percent return on investment continued to rise beyond control. According to the indictment, by August 2012, the conspirators fraudulently represented to the collective victims that their investments were worth approximately $2.8 billion, but had no accurate books and records to even determine how much cash on hand was available to pay such liability.
According to the indictment, by Aug. 17, 2012, Burks and his conspirators had only $320 million (or about 11 percent of $2.8 billion) available to pay out investors. The indictment alleges that over the course of the scheme, Burks diverted approximately $10.1 million to himself.
Burks is charged with tax fraud conspiracy for failing to file corporate tax returns or to make corporate tax payments for his companies, among other things. In addition, the indictment alleges, for tax year 2011, Burks issued fraudulent IRS Forms 1099s, causing victim-investors to file inaccurate tax returns for phantom income they never actually received.
The court has issued a summons against Burks and he is expected to appear in federal court for his initial appearance in the coming days. The wire and mail fraud conspiracy charge, the mail fraud charge and wire fraud charge each carry a maximum prison term of 20 years and a $250,000 fine. The tax fraud conspiracy charge carries a maximum prison term of five years and a $250,000 fine.
Two of Burks' conspirators, Dawn Wright Olivares, Zeek's chief operating officer, and her step-son and Zeek's senior technology officer, Daniel C. Olivares, pleaded guilty in December 2013 to investment fraud conspiracy. Dawn Wright Olivares also pleaded guilty to tax fraud conspiracy. Both defendants await sentencing.
The prosecution is handled by Assistant United States Attorneys Jenny Grus Sugar, Corey Ellis and Mark T. Odulio of the U.S. Attorney's Office in Charlotte.
Additional information and updated court filings about this and related cases filings can be accessed at the district's website: www.justice.gov/usao/ncw/ncwvwa.html.
Categories: News

Official identifies gunman in high school shooting

Fri, 10/24/2014 - 20:44
MARYSVILLE, Wash. (AP) — A government official has identified the shooter at a Washington state high school as student Jaylen Fryberg.
The official, who has direct knowledge of the situation, spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the media.
Officials and witnesses say Fryberg walked into the high school cafeteria and opened fire, killing one person and shooting several others before turning the gun on himself.
Students and parents say Fryberg played on the Marysville-Pilchuck High School football team and was recently crowned as a Homecoming prince at the high school, located 30 miles north of Seattle.
Student Malia Grato says she was friendly with Fryberg and described him as quiet, good guy.
THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.
A student walked into his Seattle-area high school cafeteria on Friday and opened fire without shouting or arguing, killing one person and shooting several others in the head before turning the gun on himself, officials and witnesses said.
Students said the gunman, who authorities have not identified, was staring at students as he shot them inside the cafeteria at Marysville-Pilchuck High School. As other students heard the gunshots, they ran out of the cafeteria and building in a chaotic dash to safety while others were told to stay put inside classrooms.
The shooter was a student at the school 30 miles north of Seattle, but Marysville Police Commander Robb Lamoureux said he could not provide more information on the gunman or his motive. Lamoureux said the shooter died of a self-inflicted wound.
Three of the people who were shot had head wounds and were in critical condition. Two young women were taken to Providence Everett Medical Center, and a 15-year-old boy was at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, hospital officials said.
Another victim, a 14-year-old boy, was listed in serious condition at Harborview as well, the hospital said.
Witnesses described the gunman as methodical in the cafeteria.
Brian Patrick said his daughter, a freshman, was 10 feet from the gunman when the shooting occurred. She ran from the cafeteria and immediately called her mother.
Patrick said his daughter told him, "The guy walked into the cafeteria, pulled out a gun and started shooting. No arguing, no yelling."
Student Alan Perez was eating his lunch at a nearby table when he heard the gunshots.
"He had a little gun in his hand. I saw the flash from the muzzle," he told KING-TV.
Another student, Austin Taylor, told the station the shooter "was just staring down every one of his victims as he shot them."
Senior Jayden Eugenio, 17, was in the library when a fire alarm went off. Someone came on the intercom and said shots had been fired and students should stay inside.
"I was shaking, you would never believe this would happen in your school," he said.
Outside the school, students started streaming out of the building, with some trying to jump a fence to get away, witnesses said.
Cedar Parker, a 17-year-old senior, said he was driving away from campus when the shooting happened. He let several students into his car as he heard others yelling for their friends: "Where are you?"
A crowd of parents waited in a parking lot outside a nearby church where they were being reunited with their children. Buses pulled up periodically to drop off students evacuated from the school, with some running to hug their mothers or fathers.
Patrick said after the shooting, his other daughter, a senior at the school, called him "hysterical" from her classroom.
"I thought, 'God let my kids be safe," he said.
FBI spokeswoman Ayn Dietrich said the agency was assisting local law enforcement and providing specialists to work with victims and their families.
Marysville-Pilchuck High School has many students from the Tulalip Indian tribe. State Sen. John McCoy, a tribal member, said the shooting had devastated the community.
"We're all related in one shape or form. We live and work and play together," he said.
Another shooting occurred June 5 in the metro area at Seattle Pacific University, where a gunman killed one student and wounded two others.
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Categories: News

Official identifies gunman in high school shooting

Fri, 10/24/2014 - 20:44
MARYSVILLE, Wash. (AP) — A government official has identified the shooter at a Washington state high school as student Jaylen Fryberg.
The official, who has direct knowledge of the situation, spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the media.
Officials and witnesses say Fryberg walked into the high school cafeteria and opened fire, killing one person and shooting several others before turning the gun on himself.
Students and parents say Fryberg played on the Marysville-Pilchuck High School football team and was recently crowned as a Homecoming prince at the high school, located 30 miles north of Seattle.
Student Malia Grato says she was friendly with Fryberg and described him as quiet, good guy.
THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.
A student walked into his Seattle-area high school cafeteria on Friday and opened fire without shouting or arguing, killing one person and shooting several others in the head before turning the gun on himself, officials and witnesses said.
Students said the gunman, who authorities have not identified, was staring at students as he shot them inside the cafeteria at Marysville-Pilchuck High School. As other students heard the gunshots, they ran out of the cafeteria and building in a chaotic dash to safety while others were told to stay put inside classrooms.
The shooter was a student at the school 30 miles north of Seattle, but Marysville Police Commander Robb Lamoureux said he could not provide more information on the gunman or his motive. Lamoureux said the shooter died of a self-inflicted wound.
Three of the people who were shot had head wounds and were in critical condition. Two young women were taken to Providence Everett Medical Center, and a 15-year-old boy was at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, hospital officials said.
Another victim, a 14-year-old boy, was listed in serious condition at Harborview as well, the hospital said.
Witnesses described the gunman as methodical in the cafeteria.
Brian Patrick said his daughter, a freshman, was 10 feet from the gunman when the shooting occurred. She ran from the cafeteria and immediately called her mother.
Patrick said his daughter told him, "The guy walked into the cafeteria, pulled out a gun and started shooting. No arguing, no yelling."
Student Alan Perez was eating his lunch at a nearby table when he heard the gunshots.
"He had a little gun in his hand. I saw the flash from the muzzle," he told KING-TV.
Another student, Austin Taylor, told the station the shooter "was just staring down every one of his victims as he shot them."
Senior Jayden Eugenio, 17, was in the library when a fire alarm went off. Someone came on the intercom and said shots had been fired and students should stay inside.
"I was shaking, you would never believe this would happen in your school," he said.
Outside the school, students started streaming out of the building, with some trying to jump a fence to get away, witnesses said.
Cedar Parker, a 17-year-old senior, said he was driving away from campus when the shooting happened. He let several students into his car as he heard others yelling for their friends: "Where are you?"
A crowd of parents waited in a parking lot outside a nearby church where they were being reunited with their children. Buses pulled up periodically to drop off students evacuated from the school, with some running to hug their mothers or fathers.
Patrick said after the shooting, his other daughter, a senior at the school, called him "hysterical" from her classroom.
"I thought, 'God let my kids be safe," he said.
FBI spokeswoman Ayn Dietrich said the agency was assisting local law enforcement and providing specialists to work with victims and their families.
Marysville-Pilchuck High School has many students from the Tulalip Indian tribe. State Sen. John McCoy, a tribal member, said the shooting had devastated the community.
"We're all related in one shape or form. We live and work and play together," he said.
Another shooting occurred June 5 in the metro area at Seattle Pacific University, where a gunman killed one student and wounded two others.
___
Categories: News