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Updated: 28 min 46 sec ago

Concert to help homeless youth Thursday

35 min 8 sec ago
A concert to help homeless youth, initially scheduled for February but canceled due to snow and inclement weather, will be held Thursday night at The Dugout in Hendersonville.
The teen rock band Theater of the Mind, which rocked the mic to a third-place finish at Asheville Music Hall's Battle of the Bands in January, will take the Dugout stage at 7 p.m. The band members — Tristan Auman, 15, Ronnie Monroe, 16, Jacob Whiteside, 18, and Jackson Pelz, 15 — will use the benefit Thursday to raise awareness and funds to support their homeless peers through Only Hope WNC.
Donations to Only Hope WNC will be collected at the event. Those who make contributions will be entered into a drawing for a Theater of the Mind CD, T-shirt or hoodie.
For more information about Only Hope WNC, visit www.onlyhopewnc.org/. For more information about the concert, call 692-9262.
Categories: News

Tiny-house measure aims to expand rental options

57 min 10 sec ago
The United Way of Transylvania County has started a “Tiny House Initiative” to encourage Brevard residents to build accessory homes less than 800 square feet in size, both to boost their property's value and increase the stock of affordable housing.
With less than a 1 percent vacancy rate, the county's rental market is currently so tight that service workers have difficulty finding housing they can afford. The United Way hopes the initiative will create more rental options while generating extra income for homeowners.
Housing Director Don Rogers of the United Way has authored a guide, “How to Build a Tiny House in Brevard,” to help homeowners deal with the building codes, city permits and financing issues associated with secondary dwellings.
Rogers said a city homeowner can expect to spend around $30,000 to build their own tiny house from scratch, or up to $60,000 for a high-end, pre-assembled model. Homeowners will be surprised how much income such a small space can generate, he said.
“We reasonably expect they could make $500 to $550 a month in rent, so even if you had someone managing the rental property for you, you could easily net $400 a month,” Rogers said. “That's better than putting it in mutual funds.”
Brevard City Council passed a resolution endorsing the initiative Monday night. Before the meeting, Councilman Wes Dickson — who owns Sycamore Cycles in Pisgah Forest and Hendersonville — voiced his support for the measure on several counts.
As a businessman and former city renter himself, Dickson understands that promoting tiny houses in Brevard offers more opportunity for service workers such as his bike shop mechanics to find rental property. It also appeals to those “who just want to downsize and live simply,” he added.
From a city standpoint, Dickson said tiny houses offer the potential for “infilling,” or accommodating growth efficiently by developing already built-up areas. With city land limited, he said, tiny houses and similar upgrades to existing property can help the city pay for projects such as bike trails and sewer upgrades.
“People can make their property more valuable and that means we can get more tax value off them,” Dickson said. “They can make more revenue and in the process provide an affordable place for service workers to live. I don't see a downside to it.”
Brevard is perfectly suited for tiny houses because city zoning rules already allow existing homeowners to add a secondary dwelling to a side or backyard as long as it doesn't exceed 800 square feet of heated space, Rogers said.
However, tiny houses in the city must be erected on a slab or other foundation and are required by code to have their own water and sewer hook-ups, said Planning Director Josh Freeman.
“It allows for a more convenient and straightforward maintenance by the city,” he explained. “It also takes the landowner out of the business of running a private water and sewer business. You don't have to charge tenants a percentage of your utility bill.”
City staff is supportive of the United Way's effort, Freeman said, because they view the tiny-house movement sweeping the country as one way the city can tackle its deficiencies in affordable housing for a growing service sector.
“We've permitted quite a few secondary dwelling units already,” he said. Most of them are what planners term “mother-in-law apartments,” or dwellings over existing garages, but Freeman said the planning office has seen an increase in calls from residents inquiring about tiny houses.
For more information on the United Way's program, visit www.unitedwaytransylvania.org/tiny-house-initiative or call Rogers at 828-883-8822.
Reach Axtell at 828-694-7860 or than.axtell@blueridgenow.com.
Categories: News

Fletcher Elementary teacher gets STEM fellowship

58 min 37 sec ago
CHARLOTTE – Stephanie Patton of Fletcher Elementary has been chosen for a three-year fellowship that prepares teachers for dynamic, hands-on learning experiences in order to deliver high-impact STEM lessons in the classroom that prepare students for real-world challenges.
Discovery Place Education Studio announced its 2015 cohort of its flagship program STEM Fellows Tuesday.
Patton and 25 others were selected from a pool of more than 70 applicants from North Carolina and South Carolina.
“STEM Fellows is not only about increasing STEM content in the classroom, but more importantly about learning how to engage students in impactful, meaningful conversations that are relevant in our everyday lives,” Discovery Place Education Studio Director Stephanie Hathaway said in a news release.
“There is an urgent need both locally and nationally to support teachers in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math. Our goal is to equip them with the right tools, technology and confidence that they need to broaden inquiry-based STEM education.”
STEM Fellows is the flagship offering of Discovery Place Education Studio and is designed to give teachers and educators skills and tools that can be adapted to meet the needs of their own classrooms. During the three-year program, participants will move from learning about STEM content and science education to becoming community problem solvers and engaging in action-based research in their own classrooms.
The new STEM Fellows were invited to participate in Discovery Place Education Studio’s first annual Carolinas STEM Conference last Friday, along with 95 other North and South Carolina educators.
The sold-out conference promoted active involvement from its participants by offering hands-on and engaging demonstrations like 3D printing, simple soldering, circuit art and ocean literacy.
“The No. 1 rule of the conference was that everything had to be fully hands-on and interactive,” Education Studio program Manager Doug Thompson, also a former middle school science teacher, said in the release. “A lot of resources go into sending teachers to conferences, so we wanted to build a STEM conference that left teachers feeling completely engaged and valued as professionals.”
In addition to the conference, STEM fellows will begin their first year engaging in immersive experiences that focus on supporting growth in pedagogy, before moving into field experiences with STEM-based partners and completing a high level research project.
The 2015 fellows join a network of Discovery Place’s previous Fellows from the past five years. STEM Fellows participation is by application only. To qualify, applicants must be full-time educators employed in North Carolina or South Carolina public, private, parochial or charter schools.
School or district-level facilitators working with STEM educators and employees of informal education institutions (e.g. museums, zoos) are also encouraged to apply.
For a full list of other professional development and STEM educator classes, visit educationstudio.org, or call 704-372-6261 ext. 505.
Categories: News

Special Olympics set for Thursday at East

2 hours 20 min ago
There are two major changes to the Henderson County Special Olympics this year — the venue and the organizer — but the overall goal remains the same as the games begin Thursday.
"We just look forward to having a great time with great athletes," new event organizer Dylan King, North Henderson's former soccer coach, said. "We've got 320 athletes coming from all over the county, from the high schools, home schools and private schools. We're really looking forward to it."
For the past three years, former Edneyville Elementary teacher Jane Ollis was the Special Olympics organizer, but she moved to South Carolina after her husband, Bruce Ollis, was named football coach at T.L. Hanna in 2014.
The event has also been held at Hendersonville High School in the past, but this year, it's headed East to East Henderson.
"We decided to have the event there because of the bigger space and because it's more accessible," King said.
Changing venues has made the annual torch run, which will be conducted by local law enforcement, about three times as long. They will be leaving the historic Henderson County Courthouse at 8:15 a.m. Thursday.
"They are going to be running a three-mile route now and ending up at East Henderson's track. From there, Special Olympics athletes will relay the torch for the final lighting," King said.
Opening Ceremonies will begin at 9:30 a.m., and the relay events will follow. The field events begin at 10:30 a.m., and there will be a break for lunch at noon. The games are scheduled to run to approximately 1:30 p.m.
Categories: News

High court: Energy companies must face price fixing claims

2 hours 48 min ago
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that energy companies can be sued under state antitrust laws for illegally manipulating natural gas prices more than a decade ago during California's energy crisis.
The justices on Tuesday ruled 7-2 against American Electric Power Co., Duke Energy Co. and other natural gas traders arguing that federal law precludes state law claims.
Natural gas customers allege the companies falsely reported data to industry trade publications, leading to higher gas prices.
A federal district court sided with the gas traders. But the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco reversed and said retail buyers of natural gas could go forward with their lawsuit.
The Supreme Court agreed in an opinion by Justice Stephen Breyer, who wrote that the state claims at issue are directed at retail pricing within the province of states and not pre-empted by federal law.
Among the consumers who sued over rise in gas prices are manufacturers Learjet, Inc., and Briggs & Stratton Corp., as well as a Colorado brewery, a Kansas school district, a Wisconsin college and a Missouri hospital.
Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Antonin Scalia dissented in Oneok v. Learjet, 13-271.
Categories: News

Got A Minute? With Kathryn Speese

4 hours 28 sec ago
Kathryn Speese, 17, is a junior at Hendersonville High. She created a charity, Pack-A-BackpackNC, which provides school supplies to local children in need.
What is Pack-A-BackpackNC and how can the community help?
Pack-A-BackpackNC is a charity that donates backpacks filled with school supplies to children with financial needs in the local schools and the foster care program in Henderson County. Each backpack is filled with supplies such as binders, notebooks, composition books and other necessary items for schools. If you would like to make a donation, please visit my website at www.PackABackpackNC.com.
How did you get the idea for Pack-A-BackpackNC and when did it begin?
In 2010, a friend and I were donating Christmas gifts to a family in need in Atlanta, Ga., (where Speese lived at the time). Noticing how much of an impact our gifts had on the children of this particular family, my friend and I decided to help other children in our community, so we created Pack-A-Backpack.
Through donations and fundraisers at churches, schools and sporting events, we were able to donate over 100 filled backpacks to children in need. When I moved to Hendersonville in 2014, I recreated the charity into Pack-A-Backpack NC. Since then, I have worked with Henderson County's Social Services and donated around 50 filled backpacks to foster care children here.
What are some cool awards you have won for your charity work so far?
In 2013, I was selected in the top 10 percent for the Prudential Spirit of Community Award. In addition, I received the President's Volunteer Service Award, with a personal letter from President Barack Obama. As an active member of the Girl Scouts since kindergarten, I was nominated for the Girl Of The Year Award for the 100th year celebration of Girl Scouts and was selected as one of the top 10 finalists.
Now, Pack-A-BackpackNC is not the only thing you've done to make a difference. What other ways have you reached out to others?
Our Girl Scout troop made blankets for the Women's Homeless Shelter in downtown Atlanta. The blankets provide a needed comfort for these women. In addition, I helped build a horse stable for rescue horses. These activities led me to achieve the Girl Scout Bronze and Silver Awards.
This past summer, I went to the Dominican Republic with my church youth group. We worked with Foundation For Peace, building a community center and working on various missionary projects in the small village. These missionary projects included working at the health clinic, hosting a Bible study class and leading worship services.
How did this mission trip impact you?
It was extremely rewarding to work with people from a developing country and help them in some small way to improve their lives. After taking four years of French and studying in Paris the previous summer, I was able to speak with the children from Haiti, who sought refuge in the Dominican Republic. This communication with the children made me realize the importance of learning foreign languages; consequently, I am now taking Spanish 1 in addition to French 4 this year.
Also, working with these amazing people made me truly appreciate everything we have in the U.S. and to never take even the simplest of items for granted. They were such happy, loving people who never complained about their situation. We went down to help them, but I never expected to learn so much from them and have such an inspirational experience.
You also went to France as well, Can you tell me about that and what you had to do to take that trip?
It all began in eighth grade when I asked my parents if I could participate in a study abroad program in Paris. I had done my research and found a program, however, the cost for the program along with the airfare was more than my parents were willing to spend. So I proposed waiting a year and paying for the trip myself, which they agreed to, assuming I would forget about it overtime.
Unfortunately (for them), they underestimated my passion to fulfill this dream. I got a job at a boutique working holidays and weekends, as well as working every Friday and Saturday night babysitting. I also put out flyers in our neighborhood for pet and house sitting and various other jobs.
After working tirelessly for seven months, I had earned enough money to pay my way. I applied for the program and in the summer of 2013 I was off to Paris with my parents' blessing. I spent an unforgettable four weeks in France. I lived with two different families, took classes, toured the city of Paris and learned the culture and language from the native people.
The experience gave me independence, the ability to adapt to another culture, work ethic, taught me the value of the dollar and appreciation for diversity, and was a priceless experience. My language skills and love for the French culture was expanded and will stay with me for the rest of my life. My hard work paid off and made my trip of a lifetime even more rewarding than I had ever expected.
Many of us get stuck in a rut of daily functions, chores and work so much that we forget to live life to a higher potential. What would you say to those who might feel like they can't make a difference?
Everyone gets stuck in a rut now and then and may feel like they can't climb out, but taking a minute to think of others and putting yourself in their shoes might help us to realize how we should treat others. Giving back reaps a feeling that is incomparable to anything else. Even the smallest of things make a difference. You don't have to travel internationally to make an impact. Giving whatever you can, whether it is time or money, helps. Even the natural things like smiling at a stranger or holding the door for someone can make a person's day. The saying “Sometimes, the brightest smiles hide the deepest secrets, the most beautiful eyes have cried the most tears and the kindest hearts have felt the most pain” contains so much truth, and we cannot get so caught up in our own lives that we miss those around us who are hurting.
Though volunteering at the homeless shelter, giving money to organizations and all of the other wonderful opportunities to help give back are great ways to make an impact, the way we conduct ourselves and treat others is a way we can help so many, without even realizing it, in such a big way.
Categories: News

Warhorse Solutions owner creates a natural clean

11 hours 57 min ago
For Tawana Weicker of Warhorse Solutions, it’s sometimes about making the world a smaller place.
“We like the fact we can go out and meet the farmer whose product ends up in our product,” she said.
Her company, which has made natural cleaners since 2007, recently began using oils from Solio Family, a group of southeastern farmers who produce non-GMO, expeller-pressed canola and sunflower oils.
Warhorse’s newest product, which has been over a year in the making, is Pure Gold All-Purpose Cleaning Soap and it, like the other products she is developing to add to the already successful lineup, uses as many U.S.-grown products as possible. It has received the Green Tier certification, the highest, on Whole Foods Market’s Eco-Scale for natural cleaners.
“We wanted to meet the high standards being set forth by the industry,” Weicker said, “and use U.S. farmers’ crops.” This is important to her because by the end of this year, Weicker’s goal is to have her products in regional chain stores that sell natural products. “We want to be selling pallets of this stuff.”
Weicker, who left a career teaching high school English to launch her business, often finds herself testing products in the middle of the night downstairs in her laboratory kitchen.
“We formulate from scratch,” she said, with no bases used.
Formulating, she added, is like cooking, and often there are televised cooking shows in the background as she dabbles with formulas using ingredients like vegetable oils, glycerin and essential oils. A newly developed product may have as many as 12 versions. Testing, often using family and friends, helps her determine which version will end up on store shelves.
“The company,” she said, “is about ingredients. We want to pack as much as possible into the bottles and use as little water as possible.” When she can, she uses whole oils that have the “original goodness” still in them.
A high school student’s project on biofuels captivated Weicker and took her from the world of English literature to that of green science. She was instrumental in developing Polk County High’s biofuels program, a rare offering still among U.S. high schools. That program, she said, has grown, with two teachers overseeing full classrooms, and has become part of the school’s science curriculum.
Glycerin is a by-product of the biofuels process, and Weicker began her products’ development by formulating cleaners from the glycerin left behind when PCHS students created biofuel. Early products included personal cleansers and cleaners used in restaurants and other businesses. Today’s “naturally aggressive, fiercely kind” products include horse, dog and household cleaners as well.
“We only wanted to have ingredients geared toward skin health,” she said, so products contain only 100 percent natural ingredients, with an intensity of fatty acids and minerals.
The new all-purpose cleaner is “very aggressive,” Weicker said, and can be used on laundry, floors, countertops, pet bedding and horse blankets, to name just a few.
“We wanted to make powerful-performing products,” she said, adding that often people think of natural cleaners as being inferior products that do not do the job as well as synthetic cleaners. She wants to banish that stereotype.
“It has to work or it doesn’t matter,” she said.
Many of their products are formulated for people who work hard and get dirty: farmers, firemen, equestrians and construction workers (like her husband, Carl) whose work jeans, spread outdoors on a table, are used as a challenge for her all-purpose cleaner.
She has about 20 businesses and individuals who help her test products as she develops them. They provide feedback that helps her tweak the product before it goes on the market.
In addition are laboratory tests, some of which have awarded her the many seals found on the front of her product labels. These seals include Blue Ridge Naturally, Got To Be NC, and USDA Biopreferred. These are important enough for inclusion on the label, Weicker said, because they indicate high standards in the industry.
Professors from Appalachian State and Western Carolina universities help with research, which has been “intense” since the company was formed. She has also provided internships for several college students, and some of her own former students work with her.
After eight years learning the ropes with natural products, formulas, testing, marketing — all that comes with developing and growing a business — Weicker says it’s time for bigger markets. She still envisions keeping operations in Polk County as much as possible, although production is currently out of Lenoir, which requires travel every two weeks or so. Weicker grew up in Pea Ridge, and still likes to make deliveries and drop off samples to customers in the area.
“We hope we’re creating jobs,” she said.
Besides her husband and her sister, Amanda Staggs, and other family members who help out when they can, she has several part-time employees and has just hired a sales team.
“Warhorse is now driving my agenda. Warhorse is telling me what to do.” And, that, she added, metaphorically (in true English teacher fashion), means “letting the horse out of the pasture.”
For more information about Warhorse Solutions, ordering its products online or finding products in regional stores, see www.warhorsesolutions.com.
Categories: News

Oskar Blues Brewery to hold fundraisers for Michelle Wilkins

11 hours 57 min ago
Oskar Blues Brewery will hold fundraisers to support Michelle Wilkins and her family in Brevard and Longmont — both places that Michelle and Oskar Blues call home — on Saturday.
Throughout the day, 43 percent of proceeds from all sales — beer, food and merchandise — at both breweries will go to support Wilkins, after she and her unborn baby girl were attacked by a woman pretending to sell baby and maternity clothes on Craigslist in Longmont. Tragically, the baby died after being cut from her mother’s womb, and Wilkins spent five days in the Intensive Care Unit.
Wilkins and her family recently moved from Brevard to Longmont, Oskar Blues said in a news release. She has a number of friends who are part of the Oskar Blues family, and the brewery family wants to support her recovery — from both of her homes.
“We are so inspired by Michelle’s strength and grace, and this hits home deeply amongst our shared communities,” Oskar Blues Soul Founder Dale Katechis said in the release. “We all want to do more, but getting our communities together to raise funds and keep Michelle in our thoughts is a start. We want to support Michelle and her family in any way we can.”
Oskar Blues’ CAN’d Aid Foundation already has given $10,000 to Michelle’s Trust Fund, and the brewery hopes to make an additional significant impact with the fundraisers.
“I would like to offer a special thanks to two of my most intimate communities, both Brevard and Longmont, and to Oskar Blues Brewery for their generosity,” said Wilkins in a statement to Oskar Blues. “I feel all of you are continuing to hold me in your thoughts, prayers and efforts by coordinating events like this. I can’t help but feel this reaffirms my belief in humankind’s inherent goodness. In times like these, that while I cannot ask anyone to carry the burden of my personal pain, people have never ceased their efforts to offer healing and support in every way humanly possible. And they make a world of difference. I am still receiving letters, cards, Facebook messages and GoFundMe website donations, and each wave of encouragement allows me to feel held and loved by your generosity.”
Both fundraisers will take place on Saturday from noon to 8 p.m in Longmont, and noon to 10 p.m. in Brevard. The Brevard event will offer live music from Conservation Theory from 6 to 8 p.m. and barbecue from the CHUBwagon from noon to 8 p.m. There will be a fundraising raffle that will include pieces donated by local artists.
The Oskar Blues trolley will be running from Asheville to Brevard. Pickup is at Aloft Hotel at 5 p.m. and return is at 9 p.m. Reserve your seats for free at oskarblueswnc.eventbrite.com.
Additional donations can be made the day of the fundraisers. Direct donations can be made online at Michelle’s GoFundMe page or mailed to The Michelle Wilkins Trust Fund, c/o The Kapsak Law Firm LLC, 1610 Hover St, Suite 203, Longmont, CO 80501.
For more information and statements from Michelle, visit www.periniassociates.com/michelle-wilkins/.
Categories: News

Community Briefs: April 21

11 hours 57 min ago
Annual benefit to help The Free Clinics
The Free Clinics’ ninth annual Spring Salon will be held at 5 p.m. Friday at Biz611 and The Landmark Apartments, located on Church Street in downtown Hendersonville. This celebration of fine food, fine beverages and fine design will help provide access to high-quality health care for those in need.
Attendees at the Spring Salon will enjoy delicacies provided by local restaurants including Champa, Hubba Hubba Smokehouse, Season’s Restaurant, Top Star Sushi Catering and Travinia Italian Kitchen.
Guests can explore the green features of The Landmark Apartments and Biz611 while enjoying wines, local coffee, craft beer and cider and exquisite foods prepared by Cuisine Team. Wine tastings on the roofdeck of the Landmark will be set against the most spectacular rooftop view in all of Henderson County.
A silent auction will feature local art by the likes of Marilyn Bailey, Jennie Francis and Stu Glassman, along with vacation getaways and local outings.
All proceeds will go to provide medical, dental and mental health care, along with prescription assistance and case management services, for the most vulnerable residents of Henderson and Polk counties. Approximately one in five residents qualify for The Free Clinics’ services because they have no health insurance and are low-income.
Tickets are available for $75 per person. To purchase a ticket, call 697-8422 or order online at www.thefreeclinics.org. Tickets will be available for sale at the event.
For more information, call 697-8422 or visit www.thefreeclinics.org.
Trade in old batteries for $5 through AAA
Motorists can receive $5 for every auto or marine battery they bring in to any AAA Car Care Centers or 58 AAA approved auto repair shops in North and South Carolina through April 26. Held every April in conjunction with Earth Day, AAA Carolinas’ Great Battery Roundup is a used battery collection and recycling program that is available to the general public, as well as AAA members.
For more information about the program, contact a local AAA Car Care Center. A list of them can be found at carolinas.aaa.com/car-care/Pages/AAA-Car-Care.aspx.
Meetings
The Clear Creek Elementary School Improvement Team will meet at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday in the school conference room.
The Etowah Elementary School Improvement Team will meet at 3:15 p.m. Wednesday in the media center.
The Fletcher Elementary School Improvement Team will meet at 3:35 p.m. Wednesday in the media center.
The Hendersonville ABC Board will meet at 10 a.m. today at the ABC Office.
The Hendersonville Elementary School Improvement Team will meet at 3:20 p.m. Wednesday in Mrs. Lawson's room.
Events
Hendersonville Community Co-op will celebrate the opening of the new store at 4 p.m. Wednesday in the courtyard, 60 South Charleston Lane, Hendersonville. The winning name for the special beer created just for the occasion from Southern Appalachian Brewery will be announced at 5 p.m. and the kegs will be tapped. Live musicians will perform. A drawing will be held for a Runa Tea bicycle. Info: 693-0505.
A workshop on elder fraud and the financial exploitation of senior citizens will be held at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday and Thursday at The Meeting Place Senior Center, 75 Carmel Lane, Columbus, with a second session at 11:30 a.m. Thursday at The Meeting Place II, 25 Shields Drive, Green Creek. Both events are free and open to the public. Info: www.sosnc.com.
Categories: News

Special Olympics set for Thursday at East

Mon, 04/20/2015 - 23:09
There are two major changes to the Henderson County Special Olympics this year — the venue and the organizer — but the overall goal remains the same as the games begin Thursday.
"We just look forward to having a great time with great athletes," new event organizer Dylan King, North Henderson's former soccer coach, said. "We've got 320 athletes coming from all over the county, from the high schools, home schools and private schools. We're really looking forward to it."
For the past three years, former Edneyville Elementary teacher Jane Ollis was the Special Olympics organizer, but she moved to South Carolina after her husband, Bruce Ollis, was named football coach at T.L. Hanna in 2014.
The event has also been held at Hendersonville High School in the past, but this year, it's headed East to East Henderson.
"We decided to have the event there because of the bigger space and because it's more accessible," King said.
Changing venues has made the annual torch run, which will be conducted by local law enforcement, about three times as long. They will be leaving the historic Henderson County Courthouse at 8:15 a.m. Thursday.
"They are going to be running a three-mile route now and ending up at East Henderson's track. From there, Special Olympics athletes will relay the torch for the final lighting," King said.
Opening Ceremonies will begin at 9:30 a.m., and the relay events will follow. The field events begin at 10:30 a.m., and there will be a break for lunch at noon. The games are scheduled to run to approximately 1:30 p.m.
Categories: News

North dominant in victory over East soccer

Mon, 04/20/2015 - 22:17
The North Henderson girls' soccer team is finally healthy.
It showed on Monday night as the Lady Knights routed East Henderson 5-0. In two conference losses this season North was never whole, but the team has rounded the corner, coach Ricardo Hernandez said.
"Right now, it seems like everyone is ready," he said.
On Monday night, multiple offensive weapons were ready. North's first goal came with 22:29 left in the first half when Savannah Dobbs got a point-blank shot at the goal from the right side. The ball slid into the left corner of the East net.
Jasmine Sanchez followed that up with a goal from 30 yards out just two minutes later.
North took a 3-0 lead into the half after a Sanchez corner kick found the back after deflecting off of an East player.
The Lady Knights (7-7, 6-2) picked up two more goals in the second half from Hermenia Garcia and Heidy Galarza.
The focus in recent practices, Hernandez said, was for the North players to control the ball more and work on passing. He saw that on Monday night.
He also saw his team finishing better, but the coach isn't satisfied. There were missed opportunities, he said.
"It's pretty good, but we can do so much better," he said.
For East (3-9, 2-6), it's just about progressing every day, Eagles coach Aaron Chappell said.
"The best way to go from here is just work," he said. "There's no other way to put it. We're building a program."
East plays Wednesday at Brevard, while North travels to Tuscola. Both matches start at 5 p.m.
Categories: News

Bearcat trio earns T-N Players of the Week honors

Mon, 04/20/2015 - 22:10
Last week was a bad week to face Hendersonville's pitching staff — it was the equivalent of running bat first into a buzz saw.
Hendersonville's Noah Linhart, Austin Redden and Carson Chet pitched lights out last week and have earned the Times-News Prep Players of the Week for their performances.
Linhart has been dominant this season as the Bearcat ace and last week was no different.
The week didn't start with Linhart dominance, but it ended with it. The Hendersonville ace put an exclamation mark on the week of stellar innings thrown against Mountain Heritage on Friday afternoon, as he pitched a no-hitter to cap off the week for the Bearcats.
The senior threw all seven innings and struck out six batters.
On Wednesday of last week, the Bearcats beat West Henderson, and all three of Hendersonville's pitchers saw action. Linhart pitched the first two innings and got the win. Redden came on in relief, and Chet closed it out. The Bearcats won the game 3-1.
On Monday, Chet and the Bearcats beat Avery County 12-0. Chet pitched Hendersonville to a one-hit shutout in the conference road win.
Last week, the Hendersonville pitching staff's line was 19 innings, 14 strikeouts, a 0.37 ERA, a 0.48 WHIP. The trio allowed just four hits in three games.
Linhart has pitched nine consecutive hitless innings.
It was definitely a strong week, Hendersonville coach Mark Cook said.
"I thought they did great," he said. "They keep working hard."
Categories: News

Rally honors Rugby Middle student's return

Mon, 04/20/2015 - 20:09
“Gritty” is the word Rugby Middle health teacher Jeff Davenport uses to describe 13-year-old student Dylan Lawson.
“He has the ability to fight through when others might crumble,” Davenport said about his former homeroom and social studies student who recently returned to Rugby Middle after missing close to a whole school year battling leukemia.
Davenport escorted Dylan around the school's gymnasium Monday as students and teachers — many clad in orange T-shirts, the color used to raise awareness of leukemia — cheered and welcomed back their classmate during a pep rally that also served as a kickoff to “Kids Against Cancer Week.”
Leading up to this Saturday's Mini-Relay for Life event, which will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Mills River Park, the week-long campaign will raise awareness of cancer and money to aid in the fight against the disease.
Among the events and activities slated for this week, students will be able to purchase a balloon and luminary to honor loved ones at this weekend's event, and a skate night will be held at Sk8t Depot with a portion of the proceeds going to Rugby's Relay for Life Team.
“We do feel like, it kind of sounds cliché, but when somebody's hurt or somebody's sick there's a lot of support behind them,” said Librarian Karen Maxon, herself a survivor of breast cancer and chairperson of Rugby's Relay for Life team.
The students and staff at Rugby made that show of support obvious Monday as one half the student body chanted, “Stay Strong,” while the other responded, “For Dylan.”
“You know, just one little word of wisdom, nobody, nobody is tougher than Dylan Lawson. Nobody,” Davenport reminded the student body.
Following the pep rally, Davenport recalled how last fall, he attempted to erase an area of his homeroom's white board reserved for student council announcements.
A reminder had been written by Dylan before his diagnosis. It read, “Turn in your boxtops,” a reference to the effort where tops to product packaging can be clipped and turned in to raise money for schools.
“I went to erase it and you would have thought an elephant herd had yelled at me, 'Don't do that!'” Davenport said. “And then one of the kids said what we all thought — and it brings tears to my eyes — That might be the last thing he ever writes.'”
It wasn't, though — the 13-year-old is enjoying his time back at school with eyes set on finishing up seventh grade and serving as a mentor to sixth-graders next year, along with joining the school's yearbook staff.
He said it wasn't a surprise that his former teacher plucked him from the bleachers during the pep rally and led him around the gym to an emotional wave of support from classmates and teachers.
“He was my teacher last year,” Dylan said of Davenport. “And he is really nice.”
Reach Biba at 828-694-7871 or jacob.biba@blueridgenow.com.
Categories: News

Vanhoy's RBI sac fly lifts North to 2-1 win over West

Mon, 04/20/2015 - 19:06
Prior to his final at-bat in Friday's baseball game against visiting West Henderson, North Henderson sophomore Austin Vanhoy was 0-for-5 with no runs or RBIs.
The bases were loaded, and the game was tied 1-1 in the bottom of the ninth — and Vanhoy delivered. He smacked a 2-0 pitch to left field, and his sacrifice fly scored Kyle Decker from third, lifting the Knights to a thrilling 2-1 win.
After his RBI, he pumped his fist in the air heading to first, and his teammates and the crowd went wild. As Decker touched home, Vanhoy trotted back to home and was mobbed by the rest of the Knights.
“That was my first walkoff. It's pretty exciting,” Vanhoy said. “I was a little nervous, but it was a great feeling when I got the hit. When it was 2-and-0 and it came down the middle, I knew that was my pitch.”
Decker led off the bottom of the ninth with a single, and Adolph Correa-Pena (2-for-3) followed with another single. Anthony Morrow had a strikeout, but the ball wasn't secured by the catcher, allowing Williams to make it to first. That set the stage for Vanhoy's heroics.
“That was a great ballgame by both teams,” North coach Justin King said. “My guys didn't have the intensity at first, but it came later in the game. We hadn't played since spring break because of all the rain, so it was good to see our guys play so well.”
Ezra Morrison (2-1) went all nine innings, allowing the one run (earned) with four strikeouts and two walks.
“I just tried to throw strikes, and my defense did an incredible job behind me. If you keep battling, you'll win ballgames, and that's what we did today,” Morrison said.
The Falcons' Dillon Curtis got the loss after taking the mound in the eighth. Starter Grant Anderson went seven innings and had six strikeouts.
West (6-4, 4-4 WNCAC) had its lone run in the top of the third on an RBI single by Curtis. North slugger Dalton McKee (2-for-4) tied the game with an RBI single in the bottom of the sixth.
“These county-rivalry games are always high intensity. It was a great game ... we just came up a little short,” Falcon coach Brandon Ball said.
Both teams face Smoky Mountain next. North ( hosts the Mustangs at 2:30 p.m. today, and West hosts the Mustangs at 7 p.m. Tuesday.
Categories: News

Despite rumors of flights ending, HonorAir flies 7 veterans to DC

Mon, 04/20/2015 - 17:56
Two days after an organizer of HonorAir Flights in Columbia, S.C., predicted the free trips for veterans might be coming to an end there, a chartered flight took off from another South Carolina runway.
Seven local World War II veterans and their guardians were onboard the nonstop flight Tuesday morning from the Greenville-Spartanburg International Airport to Washington, D.C., where the "Greatest Generation" will see the monument erected in their honor. For most of them, it would be their first time seeing the World War II memorial, but HonorAir founder, Jeff Miller, says it won't be the last flight.
Miller said groups "are still trying to accommodate any World War II veterans who have not gotten to make any trips in the past with the help of our friends in Upstate South Carolina."
The U.S. Airways chartered jet was set to take off from the Greenville-Spartanburg airport Tuesday morning for a daylong excursion at the nation's capital. The veterans' tour includes stops at the World War II, Korean, Vietnam and Iwo Jima memorials, Arlington Cemetery and the Tomb of the Unknowns.
At the end of the day, the veterans are set to fly back to Greenville-Spartanburg International Airport, where a crowd of supporters will await their momentous return.
Two trips have also been scheduled for veterans flying out of Columbia in May and October.
The National World War II Memorial opened to the public in 2004. It honors the 16 million who served in the armed forces of the U.S., the more than 400,000 who died, and all who supported the war effort from home. Symbolic of the defining event of the 20th century, the memorial is a monument to the spirit, sacrifice, and commitment of the American people, according to www.wwiimemorial.com
Reach Weaver at Emily.weaver@blueridgenow.com or 828-694-7867. Follow Weaver on Twitter at twitter.com/EmilyWORDWeaver or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/EmilyWORDWeaver
Categories: News

Flood warning, tornado watch in effect

Mon, 04/20/2015 - 16:20
The National Weather Service has issued a flood warning for the French Broad River at Blantyre from Monday afternoon until Wednesday morning or the warning is cancelled. At 7:30 p.m. Sunday, the stage was at 12.2 feet, according to forecasters. The French Broad reaches flood stage at 16 feet.
The National Weather Service has also issued a tornado watch for Henderson, Polk and Transylvania counties as well as 23 other counties until 8 p.m. this evening.
Categories: News

Got A Minute? With Kathryn Speese

Mon, 04/20/2015 - 14:54
Kathryn Speese, 17, is a junior at Hendersonville High. She created a charity, Pack-A-BackpackNC, which provides school supplies to local children in need.
What is Pack-A-BackpackNC and how can the community help?
Pack-A-BackpackNC is a charity that donates backpacks filled with school supplies to children with financial needs in the local schools and the foster care program in Henderson County. Each backpack is filled with supplies such as binders, notebooks, composition books and other necessary items for schools. If you would like to make a donation, please visit my website at www.PackABackapckNC.com.
How did you get the idea for Pack-A-BackpackNC and when did it begin?
In 2010, a friend and I were donating Christmas gifts to a family in need in Atlanta, Ga., (where Speese lived at the time). Noticing how much of an impact our gifts had on the children of this particular family, my friend and I decided to help other children in our community, so we created Pack-A-Backpack.
Through donations and fundraisers at churches, schools and sporting events, we were able to donate over 100 filled backpacks to children in need. When I moved to Hendersonville in 2014, I recreated the charity into Pack-A-Backpack NC. Since then, I have worked with Henderson County's Social Services and donated around 50 filled backpacks to foster care children here.
What are some cool awards you have won for your charity work so far?
In 2013, I was selected in the top 10 percent for the Prudential Spirit of Community Award. In addition, I received the President's Volunteer Service Award, with a personal letter from President Barack Obama. As an active member of the Girl Scouts since kindergarten, I was nominated for the Girl Of The Year Award for the 100th year celebration of Girl Scouts and was selected as one of the top 10 finalists.
Now, Pack-A-BackpackNC is not the only thing you've done to make a difference. What other ways have you reached out to others?
Our Girl Scout troop made blankets for the Women's Homeless Shelter in downtown Atlanta. The blankets provide a needed comfort for these women. In addition, I helped build a horse stable for rescue horses. These activities led me to achieve the Girl Scout Bronze and Silver Awards.
This past summer, I went to the Dominican Republic with my church youth group. We worked with Foundation For Peace, building a community center and working on various missionary projects in the small village. These missionary projects included working at the health clinic, hosting a Bible study class and leading worship services.
How did this mission trip impact you?
It was extremely rewarding to work with people from a developing country and help them in some small way to improve their lives. After taking four years of French and studying in Paris the previous summer, I was able to speak with the children from Haiti, who sought refuge in the Dominican Republic. This communication with the children made me realize the importance of learning foreign languages; consequently, I am now taking Spanish 1 in addition to French 4 this year.
Also, working with these amazing people made me truly appreciate everything we have in the U.S. and to never take even the simplest of items for granted. They were such happy, loving people who never complained about their situation. We went down to help them, but I never expected to learn so much from them and have such an inspirational experience.
You also went to France as well, Can you tell me about that and what you had to do to take that trip?
It all began in eighth grade when I asked my parents if I could participate in a study abroad program in Paris. I had done my research and found a program, however, the cost for the program along with the airfare was more than my parents were willing to spend. So I proposed waiting a year and paying for the trip myself, which they agreed to, assuming I would forget about it overtime.
Unfortunately (for them), they underestimated my passion to fulfill this dream. I got a job at a boutique working holidays and weekends, as well as working every Friday and Saturday night babysitting. I also put out flyers in our neighborhood for pet and house sitting and various other jobs.
After working tirelessly for seven months, I had earned enough money to pay my way. I applied for the program and in the summer of 2013 I was off to Paris with my parents' blessing. I spent an unforgettable four weeks in France. I lived with two different families, took classes, toured the city of Paris and learned the culture and language from the native people.
The experience gave me independence, the ability to adapt to another culture, work ethic, taught me the value of the dollar and appreciation for diversity, and was a priceless experience. My language skills and love for the French culture was expanded and will stay with me for the rest of my life. My hard work paid off and made my trip of a lifetime even more rewarding than I had ever expected.
Many of us get stuck in a rut of daily functions, chores and work so much that we forget to live life to a higher potential. What would you say to those who might feel like they can't make a difference?
Everyone gets stuck in a rut now and then and may feel like they can't climb out, but taking a minute to think of others and putting yourself in their shoes might help us to realize how we should treat others. Giving back reaps a feeling that is incomparable to anything else. Even the smallest of things make a difference. You don't have to travel internationally to make an impact. Giving whatever you can, whether it is time or money, helps. Even the natural things like smiling at a stranger or holding the door for someone can make a person's day. The saying “Sometimes, the brightest smiles hide the deepest secrets, the most beautiful eyes have cried the most tears and the kindest hearts have felt the most pain” contains so much truth, and we cannot get so caught up in our own lives that we miss those around us who are hurting.
Though volunteering at the homeless shelter, giving money to organizations and all of the other wonderful opportunities to help give back are great ways to make an impact, the way we conduct ourselves and treat others is a way we can help so many, without even realizing it, in such a big way.
Categories: News

Flat Rock Playhouse names 5 new trustees

Mon, 04/20/2015 - 13:54
Flat Rock Playhouse has inducted five new members of its Board of Trustees -- Clyde Allen, Brian Boughner, Henderson County Commissioner J. Michael Edney, Sue Fair and Paige Posey.

"We're quite honored to add our newest trustees to the board," Playhouse Artistic Director Lisa K. Bryant stated in a Monday news release. "Each of them brings professional experience and/or community and industry knowledge that will further support the board and staff and add amazing muscle to the heavy lifting already at play. Especially meaningful is that each of them is a fan of Flat Rock Playhouse and is eager to make their own positive contributions to her success. Paige Posey's appointment to the board is not only an affirmation of her great legacy and past leadership at Flat Rock Playhouse, but a recognition by the current board that her Playhouse experience and wisdom will be a welcome and prized commodity to all of us as we continue to navigate out of our troubled waters."
Clyde Allen is a Miami native and, with his wife Nina Allen, a supporter of Flat Rock Playhouse since 1960. Mr. Allen is a graduate of the University of Florida with a Bachelor of Architecture. His work history includes designing and constructing residential properties, professional offices, shopping centers, apartments and government facilities from 1963 to 2010. He has previously served as president on the Brevard Section of the American Institute of Architects and on the Board of Directors at Orlando Federal Savings and Loan. The Allens moved their primary residence to Bent River Farm in Transylvania County, and later moved to Kenmure.

Brian Boughner is a co-founder and principal with Parallel Financial Partners in Greenville, S.C. He began his investment career in 2000 at the very top of the biggest stock bull market. During the past 15 years of his career, he has helped his clients successfully manage their investments through the 9/11 terrorist attack, two equity bear markets, a housing bust, and a credit implosion. He is a Florida State University graduate, a CFA charter holder, and a Chartered Market Technician. His community involvement includes board chair for the Greenville Little Theatre and member of the United Way Palmetto Society and Evaluation Team.

J. Michael Edney is a seventh generation Hendersonville native, a direct descendant of William Mills, who is credited by early historians as being the first non-Indian settler in present-day Henderson County. He is a graduate of Hendersonville High School, UNC-Asheville and The University of South Carolina School of Law. He has engaged in the private practice of law in Hendersonville since 1985. In addition to serving on numerous boards and committees over the years, Edney is currently serving his fourth term on the Henderson County Board of Commissioners. He has served as chairman of the board on three separate occasions. He is married to Lisa Mazzeo Edney from Vero Beach, Fla., and they have a 14-year-old son and a 10-year-old daughter.

Sue Fair is the department chair, an instructor, the designer and managing director in the Theatre Arts Department at Gardner-Webb University. She is originally from Hendersonville and worked professionally at Florida State University, Tallahassee Community College and Young Actors Theatre before coming back to Western North Carolina. She has directed many shows, including "Big River," "Charley and the Chocolate Factory," "Into the Woods," "Annie," and "Wizard of Oz." Fair has acted in several commercials, training films, plays and films and also wrote two television pilots for Nickelodeon, one of which was recently filmed. She earned her graduate degree in Theatre from Florida State University and her undergraduate degree in Theatre Education from Florida A&M University.

Paige Posey traveled from her home state of Mississippi and Delta State University to Flat Rock in 1982 to apprentice at Flat Rock Playhouse. During her college years, she returned to the Playhouse to work seasonally as an actor and head the properties department. She also worked in Atlanta at both the Academy and the Alliance Theatres, gaining more professional experience before graduating magna cum laude in 1987 from the University of Southwestern Louisiana (now ULL) with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Theatre and a minor in art. She met her husband, Mark Warwick, who was apprenticing at the Playhouse in 1987. In 1993 Paige accepted a permanent position of company manager at Flat Rock Playhouse and was part of the management team that saw the transition of Flat Rock Playhouse as a summer stock theater to a year-round operation, growing the budget from $300,000 to over $3 million annually. As a director, Union performer and administrator, she was involved with over 250 productions. By 2011, Posey was serving as Managing Director of Flat Rock Playhouse when she resigned her position at the theater, shifted career paths and joined her husband to focus on the family business of building a community radio station – WTZQ 1600 AM. Since that time, WTZQ has grown from 1,000 watts to a 5,000-watt regional radio station with an emphasis on community activism and entertainment. Posey currently works as business office manager and on-air personality. She has served on the board of The Arts Council of Henderson County, and she and Warwick are currently serving as co-chairs of the 2015 United Way of Henderson County Capital campaign.
Categories: News

Friends of the Falls celebrates 15-year victory

Mon, 04/20/2015 - 08:26
On April 6, 2000, a patchwork group of 22 locals, former DuPont X-ray film plant employees and government officials formed a force that kept the land they cherished open to the world.
That same group will meet Tuesday evening at their humble starting point, the Henderson County Public Library auditorium, to reminisce on what they achieved and celebrate where DuPont State Recreational Forest is today.
During that pivotal meeting a decade and a half ago, excitement coursed through the room as the group determined what lay ahead of them, said Aleen Steinberg, one of the original 22 activists.
Of the more than 10,400 acres that became the state forest, Steinberg says Mine Mountain is her favorite area.
“The mountain and beautiful woods give me this feeling of being centered with the world. Until you experience something like this, it's hard to explain,” said Steinberg, who lives on Cedar Mountain.
It was that experience that she and the other core members of what would become Friends of the Falls sought to protect.
By their first meeting, 7,600 acres of DuPont X-ray film plant's original 10,400-acre property, including Hooker Falls, had already been purchased by the Conservation Fund and given over to the state for public use. The other approximately 2,200 acres containing High Falls, Triple Falls and Bridal Veil Falls in the heart of DuPont fell into the hands of developer Jim Anthony, who planned to turn the natural paradise into a gated community.
At the beginning of 2000, former Attorney General Mike Easley had called for action to save DuPont in a letter he wrote to the paper. The letter caught the eye of Zirconia native and longtime DuPont explorer David Coggins.
“I was moved because of that letter to call the library and set up a meeting and have the event in the paper,” Coggins said. So he and Dr. Ken Shelton, who had written a column supporting the state's desire to acquire the 2,200 acres, called a meeting at the Henderson County Public Library.
Giving the presentation was former DuPont engineer Jeff Jennings, who wanted no gate ever to close off the natural paradise in which he spent so much of his time.
“I credit Ken Shelton and Doug Coggins with initiating that meeting,” Jennings said.
He and Hendersonville attorney Sam Neill had given the same presentation just two days before to the Council of State, telling DuPont's story and asking that 440 acres of it be preserved for public use.
Instead, Easley and former Gov. Jim Hunt surprised them with the promise to claim all 2,200 acres by eminent domain.
“It was a once-in-a-lifetime experience,” Jennings said. “Not only were these big guys interested in our proposal, but they also magnified it by four.”
For the state to move ahead, however, the officials needed to hear that residents wanted DuPont. So Jennings stepped onto the auditorium stage and into his role as the orator, presenting Neill's slides to an audience of more than 40 people, half of which would become the core group.
Like the politicians in Raleigh, residents recognized the beauty and intrinsic value of the forest. Jennings recalled that they responded especially to one particular slide, a color photo of Triple Falls taken by former DuPont Corp. employee Bill Thomas.
“It's funny the picture today isn't that unusual, but imagine back in the day when digital photography wasn't that mature and not that many people were out there competing for best picture,” Jennings said.
That meeting sparked what became a six-month fight to win back the property. The fight ended in a final meeting in Raleigh during which the Council of State unanimously voted to invoke eminent domain on Oct. 23, 2000.
“I remember that was a Monday because Friends of the Falls had our weekly meetings on Mondays,” Steinberg said. She said the call came just before the meeting time.
“She got the champagne cooled fast then,” Jennings joked.
The first waterfall tract of Triple Falls opened to the public Dec. 17, and the remaining property followed.
Over the following decade and a half, DuPont State Forest became one of Western North Carolina's most-visited natural areas. It has been the site for two blockbuster films and a playground for hundreds of thousands of fishermen, hikers, bikers, paddlers and horseback riders.
More than 400,000 people visited DuPont last year, and more are expected this year, Steinberg said.
“What we managed to accomplish 15 years ago and more like almost 20-25 years ago is really very satisfying now,” said state Rep. Chuck McGrady, R-Henderson.
McGrady's former role as president of Carolina Mountain Land Conservancy helped secure the first 7,600 acres of the forest, and his connection with Neill and continued efforts contributed to the remaining acres.
“We were able to protect a pretty special place and put it into public ownership.” McGrady said. “There are a lot of people who can be counted in the effort; I just played a part of a role.”
While the group on Tuesday will celebrate its victory 15 years ago, memebrs will also be looking to DuPont's future.
Bill Yarborough, special assistant to the North Carolina Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler, will give a special announcement about DuPont State Forest, Steinberg and McGrady said.
At this point, neither of them knows what that announcement will be. They do, however, know how far the now-named DuPont State Recreational Forest has come.
“It's exciting time for a lot of reflection you stop and think and all of a sudden you realize you've come a long way, baby,” Steinberg smiled.
Reach Kerns at charli.kerns@blueridgenow.com or 828-694-7881. Follow @BRNCharli.
Categories: News

Breakfast all day, family vibe makes cafe success

Mon, 04/20/2015 - 08:23
There's a joke among the employees at Fidelia's Café that the building it's in is haunted, which could be true based on the string of failed restaurants that preceded the café. However, the flood of customers that come for the food, family atmosphere and friendly staff could be a sign that the ghost has fled at last.
“We've got several busy times during the week, and Sundays we're just packed from opening at 8 a.m. until we close at 3 p.m.,” House Manager Alex Ruiz said. The cafe's regular customers range from businessmen enjoying the off-hours solitude to church-goers who come for brunch.
Maureen Brown and her husband, Skeet, are two such members from Etowah United Methodist who come on Sundays. On Thursday, however, they were enjoying a late lunch with their granddaughter, Amelia, and some friends.
“It's nice that they're okay with children here and serve the senior community well,” Maureen said. People from her church come here almost every week to eat and enjoy one another's company.
“This has become a little bit of a social hub,” Maureen added. “Many of the restaurants that were here before you'd have no idea when they were open.”
A few restaurants have come in and out since 2010, including Grass Roots Café & Ice Cream Parlor and The Homestead Café. The restaurants tended to feature higher-end food, and Maureen said she felt there were not enough staff or seats for everyone.
Fidelia's aims to always have a seat and friendly server available. That kind of service is what Ruiz says the restaurant is going for.
“We want to serve everyone like they're family, know what's new going on in their lives. They love sharing that with us, too,” Ruiz said, adding that the staff has gotten to know many residents since the restaurant opened in January.
“We have regulars who order the same thing every time, and we start cooking their dishes the moment they walk through the door,” Ruiz said.
Fidelia's Cafe's personal-touch vibe reflects the family-oriented nature of the staff members. Owners Fidelia and husband Jose Torres have four children, who stay at the restaurant after school. Ruiz's son is a waiter. Chef Adam Bryant works alongside his brother, Tim Norton. Norton's wife, Kelly, bakes the pastries on display by the entrance door, including a tall chocolate cake with raspberry icing that was featured on Thursday's specials.
While the couple own the business together, Fidelia is the one who runs the show. Jose manages another business, but Fidelia said he was instrumental in redoing almost the entire inside of the building.
“It was dark and dingy before,” Ruiz said. Where a dark green carpet was now is wood, and light, neutral tones replaced the former deep brown walls. Large windows let in natural light, which falls on wooden tables and chairs.
“It just has this breakfast-all-day log cabin kind of feel to it,” Tim Norton said.
As for why the restaurant features breakfast all day on its menu, Fidelia's answer is pretty simple: “I just really like breakfast. I think everybody does.”
Fidelia's Cafe is located at 4165 Brevard Road, Horse Shoe. Its hours are from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Sunday's hours are from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. The phone number is (828) 595-9359.
Reach Kerns at charli.kerns@blueridgenow.com or (828)694-7881. Follow @BRNCharli.
Categories: News